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Duratec stretch bolts

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  • Duratec stretch bolts

    I am putting my Duratec back together and have run into a question regarding the factory stretch bolts for the head. The manual provides a 5-stage process to torque them down, but it doesn’t stipulate if this procedure is for oiled threads. Given the extreme torque level, I assume that oiling the threads is the correct procedure, but given it isn’t explicitly stated in the manual I am not 100% certain. Does anyone know?

    BTW I had an interesting discovery while looking over the block yesterday. I found 2 washers (1 flat, and 1 lock) for an M5 or M6 bolt in the water jacket for #4. I bought my engine from Kansas Racing Products several years ago and it had never been fired. I can’t confirm that Ford didn’t disassemble it at some point, but if they did, then they went through the trouble to torque everything down properly since the engine has lasted about 9000 miles without incident. The only other explanation I can think of is that these washers fell into the jacket during initial assembly. Ford. Quality is job one. Yeah…right. ;)

    -John
    Westfield SEiW
    2.0L Duratec
    Throttle Steer

  • #2
    John,

    I may have an extra set of ARP upgraded head studs to sell you, torque instructions included. I'll know later today after I've sorted out my inverntory.

    /Magnus F.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Magnus, but I decided to stick with the factory stretch bolts to save a little money. I am only running about 220hp, so I bought a new set a few months ago (I have a source for Ford parts at cost +10%). The big problem I have now is figuring out how to reassemble everything without a keyed crank/pulley setup. It appears that I either need to buy a special tool from Ford to hold the pulley in place while it is torqued down or fabricate a substitute. I also need to figure out how to hold the crank in place during this procedure. I can’t find a flywheel lock and the factory manual doesn’t explicitly address this situation. They describe a tool (Timing Peg, Crankshaft TDC) that is placed in a port on the exhaust side of the engine which is used to keep the crank at TDC when installing the cams, but it seems like a dicey setup to use that to hold the crank when applying the necessary torque on the crank pulley bolt. Has anyone else dealt with this? If so, what did you do?


      Thanks,
      John
      Westfield SEiW
      2.0L Duratec
      Throttle Steer

      Comment


      • #4
        The tools you want are:
        303-507 (TDC pin), looking suspiciously like a regular screw. It goes into a hole in the front cover and stops the crank just at TDC. I will use a regular screw for this one, possibly machined at the top so that it engages the crank exactly at TDC.

        You then insert a M6x25 screw into the pulley to lock it up and torque the whole thing according to spec.

        303-465 (cam key thingy). A very simple bar of metal that fits into the slots at the end of the cams while being flush with the head. I will take the necessary measurements and go to home depot to see if they have anything that fits.

        /Magnus F.

        Comment


        • #5
          I can’t find a flywheel lock and the factory manual doesn’t explicitly address this situation. They describe a tool (Timing Peg, Crankshaft TDC) that is placed in a port on the exhaust side of the engine which is used to keep the crank at TDC when installing the cams, but it seems like a dicey setup to use that to hold the crank when applying the necessary torque on the crank pulley bolt. Has anyone else dealt with this? If so, what did you do?
          I had to do this when my aftermarket pulley packed it in. The "special Ford tool" I purchased and used was a major PITA. The crank is held in position by that feeble little bolt and it cannot be relied upon for holding everything in place. So you have to get this other tool that works kind of like the rack from the Spanish Inquisition to hold it all in place whilst (English English :D) trying to torque everything down to the 2 zillion ft. lbs. required so that the bolt don't come loose and all that money goes KA-BLUWEEE.

          I have all of those tools if anyone wants to use them. Getting the ridiculous hold-da-pulley-n-torque-da-bolt tool was the hardest to find, and the most expensive.

          To hold the cams in position just use a file or stop by a metal supply place and find a 1" W x 12"-15" long x ? thick (I'll measure mine when I get home) bar. Buying that "tool" was a major rip-off.

          Hmmm, pitted out brand new Cozzy bearings, zillion dollar special tool purchases (that'll be used exactly once - unless you don't get it right :-O), non-keyed cranks, etc. etc. etc. This is starting to make my decision to deal w/ the logistics of the Ammo motor look positively brilliant :D

          Magnus, John, lemme know if ya wanna use em. No special charge.
          Chris
          ------------
          A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

          Comment


          • #6
            Oh, and...

            Btw, it'll be waaaay easier to torque the bolt *before* you stick the engine back in the car :D (I didn't have that option, or rather, decided to do it w/ engine in situ rather than the removing it - torque a single bolt - replace option). Ford did this btw because the Duratec is thought of a throw-away motor. It's designed to only be built once. At 2 million+ units being built every year I can see why. They have no residual value.

            Do *not* rely on the little bolt to hold the crank in position. It simply is not big enough to resist the amount of force that is required to torque the crank bolt.

            I have a URL somewhere at home where a person posted the Ford procedure. I'll give it a look after work and post it then.
            Last edited by moosetestbestanden; April 23, 2007, 12:55 PM.
            Chris
            ------------
            A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

            Comment


            • #7
              Yes please. I'd like to borrow the Duratec inquisitor tool. I will make it comply!

              I got my valves and some other goodies today. The Raceline water rail does not fit the Focus or Ranger head unless you remove the cylinder head protutions where you screw in the lift ear, which I plan to do tonight.

              /Magnus F.

              Comment


              • #8
                I am toying with making my own tools. Chris, if I can't figure out a way to do so using my limited fabrication facilities, then I would love to borrow the Ford items. Part of me wishes that I had keyed the crank which would make this whole process easier, but right now I just want the damn thing back together and on the road.

                Looking at the Ford manual (available here for download), it appears that the TDC pin is used to prevent the crank from rotating while the very expensive item that slots into the crank pulley prevents that from rotating while you torque down the pulley bolt. The little bolt that attaches the pulley to the block is simply there to locate the pulley, not to prevent it from rotating under high torque loads.

                Is the TDC pin really sufficient to stop the crank from rotating under load? If it works, then I will try that approach. Otherwise I need to make a flywheel lock out of some scrap aluminum I have lying around. Man, my Alfa was a much easier engine to put back together ;)

                Magnus, I discovered the little issue with the Raceline Water rail when I tried to install it a few years ago. It sounds like they still don't mention that when you buy it.
                Westfield SEiW
                2.0L Duratec
                Throttle Steer

                Comment


                • #9
                  F****CK!

                  I just paid 75 bucks on ebay for that manual.

                  CRAP!

                  /Magnus F.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ouch!! If it helps, here is a link to a place where you can purchase Ford parts at cost +10%. I've used them before and have no complaints.

                    -John
                    Westfield SEiW
                    2.0L Duratec
                    Throttle Steer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Magnus

                      If you bought the official Ford Manual on DVD that may not be that bad a deal. It should have more information, most of which you won't need. All I see from the free download is some jpg images.

                      I have the Ford Manual for the Zetec, and some Duratecs as well. Also bought on Ebay.

                      As Scott E. just found out there are differences between the Focus Duratec and the Ranger. Even though both are 2.3L.

                      I bought similar factory tools for the cams and crank position for the Zetec. Ford doesn't sell them but sent me to the company that does. I don't recall them being cheap but not especially expensive either.

                      The crank positioning bolt for the Zetec is special type and length.

                      Here is where the local Ford dealer sent me for the special tools:

                      http://www.motorcraftservice.com/vdi...d=pubs_rotunda

                      Snap-On and Matco may have them as well.

                      Doug
                      Last edited by Doug Liedblad; April 23, 2007, 04:09 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I just dug em out. I'll post a pic in a minute. Link I used to do the thing is here:

                        http://home.att.net/~biker16/timing_duratecI4.htm

                        You can ignore lots of the instructions as it is for replacing something else that required the pulley operation.

                        The bar for the cams is 9" long x 1" or so wide by 5mm thick.

                        More in a minute

                        Edit: Magnus, what vb code do I use to embed the photos in the message?
                        Last edited by moosetestbestanden; April 23, 2007, 05:57 PM.
                        Chris
                        ------------
                        A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          OK. Here's a lo rez pic of the tools. The peg is the crank-freezer (I reiterate - it is NOT to be relied on to secure the crank whilst torquing), the 2 bolt-like things w/ the funny heads are used to slot through the pulley to hold it in position whilst torque is applied. Note the value of 76 ft.lbs. + 1 quarter turn more.

                          This was a many many cuss word job to do solo whilst (I'm practicing for an upcoming trip:D) the engine is in the car. Should be much simpler w/ it on a stand. Many hands would help too, for sure.
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by moosetestbestanden; April 23, 2007, 06:50 PM.
                          Chris
                          ------------
                          A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I just checked into the price for the tools. I can pick up the TDC peg for $26 and the pulley holder for $104. The tightening process really has me concerned though. I think to do it properly I will need to make a flywheel lock and either modify the pulley holder so it cannot move at all or make my own. The other option is to take the motor apart and have the pulley and sprockets keyed. I hate the idea of stripping everything down to do that, but it might be the smartest thing in the long run.

                            Cosworth seems comfortable not using a key on their 260hp engines though. I wonder how they tighten everything up? Special tools they designed or just the standard Ford tools that make me nervous?

                            -John
                            Westfield SEiW
                            2.0L Duratec
                            Throttle Steer

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Buy the tools and do it sez I - you won't need anything else (I didn't). I shouldn't think it'll be that difficult if the engine's on a stand. Getting at it at the right angle w/ the engine in the car and doing it alone is what made it hard for me. It is the Jesus Bolt (helicopter maintenance parlance) but I managed, somehow. Don't forget the little 6mm pulley aligning bolt and follow the instructions to only tighten it finger tight. It's *only* to put the timing ring in the right location.

                              Scott: If you're watching (and you should be:D) you'll need these tool too. Just give a holler when you're ready and I'll pop over to assist.
                              Last edited by moosetestbestanden; April 24, 2007, 10:00 AM.
                              Chris
                              ------------
                              A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

                              Comment

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