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HOT legs (Normal?)

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  • HOT legs (Normal?)

    How can you tell I'm a new owner, so many questions!!

    I have noticed that when driving my legs get really hot, is this normal for these cars? I have a '92 with the Kent 1700cc motor and it is RHD so the headers are on the other side.

    Assuming this is normal, does anyone know of any sort of tastefully done modifications available to get some air flow in to the car? Such as say an air duct under the fender? Thoughts?

    What is the best oil to use in this car, 20-50 or 10-30 etc? We rarely get snow, have a pretty mild climate here in Victoria (BC).

    Thanks, Pat

  • #2
    Absolutely normal, TADTS.

    There have been books written about mitigation measures. Lately e.g. on USA7s

    Try to apply any or all of them that make sense to you and you will get some relief.

    The only comprehensive solution is probably that of the Stalker type Seven with the side skin omitted around the footwell end.

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    • #3
      The very experienced chap who rebuilt my 1700 crossflow strongly recommended diesel engine oil such as Shell's Rotella T1 straight grade SAE30 because of higher levels of "anti-wear" zinc-containing additives. But that's here in SoCal.

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      • #4
        Sorry to hear about your hot legs. It kind of goes with the territory; you know, cool head and warm toes. Caterham makes an insulating kit, consisting of pre-cut panels of aluminized mat with adhesive on one side. However they are best installed on a new car with clean panels and before the major hardware items are put in place. Installing them on an existing car would be difficult considering oil contamination on the panels and the lack of working room.

        Alternately, I've used a different approach on some other cars I've built/restored. You can put some insulating material inside the footwell and under the carpet. With some creative work, you can finish the footwell off with a variety of paneling materials. That helped on the MGC-GT I worked on many years ago, and the footwells were ultimately finished off with some veneer that closely matched some other wood in the interior. Anyone who's driven an MGC-GT knows what a furnace that engine is!

        The venting that Slomove described would be a definite help, but all the obvious (and unobtrusive) routes are already filled with hot air from the radiator on back. Please post what you've done if you take that route. Good luck!
        Clark

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        • #5
          I cut some panels from R-Tech foil faced insulation, duct taped the cut edges, and surfaced them with cheap home depot carpet. They drop fit into the footwell, and do a nice job of keeping the heat from coming up through the soles of my shoes. The footwell is still warm, but it is significantly improved from the bare metal floor I originally dealt with. Come winter, I take them out. A nice $20 solution.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NigelT View Post
            The very experienced chap who rebuilt my 1700 crossflow strongly recommended diesel engine oil such as Shell's Rotella T1 straight grade SAE30 because of higher levels of "anti-wear" zinc-containing additives. But that's here in SoCal.
            The powers that be have forced even the diesel engine oil makers to reduce the amount of ZDDP, the zinc anti-wear additive. I believe it's higher than the automotive spec but it's lower than it was.

            If worried about this, it would apply to crossflows more than the newer engines, you should use a racing motor oil. Redline, Valvoline, or others. You can get a ZDDP additive from several sources too.

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            • #7
              I used this racing oil for a while with high ZDDP content, mainly because I know the chemist who formulates this (also a Seven driver). It is marketed to the tractor pulling folks with super high power motors. But it can be ordered only directly from the manufacturer and I found that too complicated. Lately I have been using Shell Rotella T6 10W40 synthetic Diesel engine oil. Supposedly somewhat better stuff, not cheap but you can get it anywhere. So far so good, the tappets in my engine looked quite pristine last time I checked.

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              • #8
                I think the flat tappet problem was more to do with older engines but who knows what will come up over time.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Doug Liedblad View Post
                  I think the flat tappet problem was more to do with older engines but who knows what will come up over time.
                  You mean like the flat tappers in a Kent engine?

                  That's why I've been using Brad Penn PennGrade" 20-w50 in my 109e. It is the same stuff as the old green Kendall GT-1 oil from my youth. The Rotella, as mentioned above is supposed to be OK, as is the current formulation of Kendal GT-1 with Liquid Titanium by Phillips. There may be others as well.
                  EscondidoRon

                  '62 Lotus Seven
                  '84 Turbo Esprit (x2)
                  '14 Evora
                  '77 Esprit S1 (RIP) :(

                  "A man must keep a little back shop where he can be himself without reserve. In solitude alone can he know true freedom." -Michel De Montaigne 1588

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                  • #10
                    Can anyone tell me what the material is (if any) that is sandwiched between the inner kick panel and the outer skin on the side of the car ('92) under the front fender?

                    Also, just a side question from this thread. I noticed the trans tunnel is pop riveted in place! If I want to do some work on the linkages this winter is there enough access to them via that little panel the shift boot sits in?
                    Thanks, Pat

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