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Duratec build initiated.

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  • Duratec build initiated.

    Today I will go down to Cosworth with huge wads of cash in my hands and pick up a very nice collection of parts.

    The engine will have the following stats:
    Duratec 2.3L
    Cosworth machined head.
    Three stage dry sump setup with internal scavenger pump.
    Stock 30/35 mm valves
    11.3 lift on intake cam.
    9.95 mm lift on exhaust cam.
    Upgraded valve springs
    Forged pistons with a compression rate of 12:1. (Will run one 91 octane)
    Forged con rods
    Upgraded oil pump
    Upgraded fuel injectors
    Lightened flywheel (10.5 lbs) with a 8.5" AP clutch.
    Titan Motorsport alu bell housing.
    45 mm Jenweys
    Various bolts packs.
    Oil cooler.
    My old T6 ECU to run everything.

    I believe I will be looking at 250HP with a max 7800 RPM when I am done. I will probably setup two maps that I can switch between from the dash in order to utilize 91 or 100 octane.

    I haven't decided on all the details for the cooling part. I have some rails and other stuff, but must look into the alternator/waterpump setup and figure out which route to go.

    I'll snap pictures during the process.

  • #2
    All that cash was just adding weight, right?:D
    Where will you source your clutch/flywheel?
    - Sean

    Comment


    • #3
      I got it from Woody.

      Looks like a cosworth flywheel, but I cannot say for sure.

      /Magnus F.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here ya go Magnus, watch n learn:D

        http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...=duratec&hl=en
        Chris
        ------------
        A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

        Comment


        • #5
          Actually a very good video.

          Tnx!

          /Magnus F.

          Comment


          • #6
            Day 1.

            I have most of the parts except the valves, the dry sump and some minor bits and pieces.
            I started by cleaning out the garage and then lined up all the parts for the build:

            A happy moment indeed.

            The mystery of the "red engines" has now been solved after a chat with Cosworth. These engines came out on the market about 12-18 months ago as new crate engines with a red spray mark on them. It turned out that they were damaged during installation, and therefore junked. A closer look at my engine revealed a minor dent in one of the treads where the lift ear is attached. There is an "X" mark there, probably made by the guy at the factory installing the engine. I couldn't care less since the dent is on the head, which I will not use.

            I started bu removing the pan and front cover, which was quite easy/ The silicon gasket gunk provided some resistance which was quickly crushed by my mallet.
            The result is seen below:


            A shot directly from below reveals the soon-to-be-removed crank and oil pump (in the upper left corner).


            I then removed the head, crank, pistons and oil pump, which was also straight forward. Allthough I did manage to ruin one of the stock pistons due to a stupid mistake I will not write about here.

            All parts went into labeled ziplock bags, and all bolts were reinstalled in their original treads. All to ease reassembly.

            The finished stripped engine block looks like this:

            I will use a scotch bright to get rid of the gasket gunk.

            Speaking of gunk, it seems like Ford used a bit too much of the silicone sealing since there were loose strans of it hanging inside the engine:

            If one of these breaks loose and plugs an oil channel, the engine will probably be ruined.

            After deburring some edges and cleaning out the engine with rubbing alcohol and compressed air, I prepared to reassemble the crank with the new pistons. That was when I discovered that of the main bearing shells had some damage to it that I am fairly sure I did not inflict:


            I will pick up a new bearing tomorrow at Cosworth.

            I then turned my attention to the pistons and con rods, which I assembled with a minimum of problems. When it was time to do the rings, I saw that the bottom oil ring did not have its two support rings that I believe it should share its groove with. I stopped there until I get confirmation from Cosworth on this one.
            Last image of the day is the billet 12:1 CR pistons and con rods waiting for the rings.

            The red thick fluid at the pistons is surprisingly enough not my blood, but an extremely thick (thnk syrup) assembly oil dyed red so that you can see where it has been applied. Quite useful.

            To be continued.

            /Magnus F.
            Last edited by magnusfeuer; April 22, 2007, 05:12 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              nice pics

              Magnus,

              Good sleuthing re: red engines.

              All the pretty parts! mmmm.

              Why the dry sump? Seems to be extra weight to me. Was this something that Cosworth recommended?

              Looks like you are having fun!! :D :D

              Cheers,

              Tom

              PS: I found I could not use the stock pan bolts with the wet sump, I suspect you may have a similar problem with the dry sump. I ended up sourcing some cap head bolts locally. Also, fwiw, the gasket gunk is "the right stuff" by permatex. It is expensive (I paid about $15 for a can), but well worth it.
              Last edited by Elv15; April 22, 2007, 10:49 PM.
              Tom "ELV15" Jones
              http://PIErats.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Gee. I got the car up on jackstands & washed my wheels yesterday...
                Chris
                ------------
                A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

                Comment


                • #9
                  I can't really say why I went with the dry sump. Chris never had any surging problems with his Raceline wet sump, but I guess I wanted the full monty while I was at it. Also better clearance.

                  Note that this wet sump is driven by the same chain as the oil pump, No external belts that can snap and ruin your day (and engine). It only has two connections, one for outgoing oil (to the tank), and one for incoming oil (from the tank, through the cooler). Doesn't get much cleaner than that.

                  The cylinder head will be interesting, since my discussion with other gear heads usually goes:

                  - So you bought a Cosworth kit. Cool.
                  - Tnx.
                  - Who will assemble the head.
                  - I'll do it myself.
                  - Ooooh. Good luck with that one.

                  I have read up on the subject and purchased a valve spring compressor, so I am vaguely optimistic.

                  Later, I will give Soareyes a call so that he can extract a valve lock from my eyeball, into which it has been fired by an upgraded valve spring.

                  /Magnus F.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Also better clearance.
                    The bell housing is the low point. Still, if you've got to have one, the internal pump dry sump is the only way to go.
                    Chris
                    ------------
                    A day you don't go a hundred is a day wasted

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by magnusfeuer

                      Later, I will give Soareyes a call so that he can extract a valve lock from my eyeball, into which it has been fired by an upgraded valve spring.

                      /Magnus F.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Magnus

                        Sometimes a special spring compressor is needed for the recessed valve springs. If so I have a friend that has one.

                        You can download the engine assembly video as a screesaver here:

                        http://www.pooyae.com/media/DeutzEngine.zip

                        Stan, can you get those with prescription lenses?

                        Doug

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I was a bit unsure about various tolerances, but it turned out that google is your friend:

                          Little2.0

                          ALL SPECS ARE 100% ACCURATE AND, DONT ASK WHERE I GOT THEM.
                          General Specifications ItemSpecification
                          EngineDisplacement2.0L
                          No. of cylinders4
                          Bore/stroke87.5/83.1
                          Firing order1-3-4-2
                          Oil pressure (hot @ 2,000 rpm)200-268 kPa (29-39 psi)
                          Oil capacity3.9L + 0.38L (4.1 qt + 0.4 qt) with filter
                          Cylinder BlockCylinder bore diameter87.5-87.53 mm (3.444-3.445 in)
                          Cylinder bore maximum out-of-round0.008 mm (0.0003 in)
                          Main bearing bore diameter57.020-57.038 mm (2.244-2.245 in)
                          Head gasket surface flatness0.1 mm/general 0.05 mm/200 x 200 (0.004 in/general) (0.0019 in/7.87 x 7.87)
                          PistonDiameter (1)87.5-87.51 mm (3.444-3.445 in)Diameter (2)87.51-87.52 mm (3.4452-3.4456 in)Diameter (3)87.52-87.53 mm (3.444-3.446 in)
                          Piston-to-bore clearance0.025-0.045 mm (0.0009-0.0017 in)
                          Ring groove width — top1.203-1.205 mm (0.0473-0.0474 in)
                          Ring groove width — 2nd1.17-1.19 mm (0.0.460-0.0468 in)
                          Ring groove width — oil2.501-2.503 mm (0.0984-0.0985 in)
                          Piston skirt coating thickness0.008-0.020 mm (0.0003-0.0007 in)
                          Piston PinDiameter20.995-21.0 mm (0.8266-0.8268 in)
                          Length59.6-60.4 mm (2.346-2.377 in)
                          Piston-to-pin clearance0.008-0.016 mm (0.0003-0.0006 in)
                          Pin-to-rod clearancePress fit
                          Cylinder HeadValve lift @ zero lash (exhaust)7.7 mm (0.30 in)Valve lift @ zero lash (intake)8.8 mm (0.35 in)
                          Valve guide diameter5.509-5.539 mm (0.216-0.218 in)
                          Valve seat width — intake/exhaust0.99-1.84 mm (0.038-0.072 in)
                          Valve seat angle45 degrees
                          Valve seat runout0.075 mm (0.0029 in)
                          Valve lash adjuster bore diameter31.00-31.03 mm (1.220-1.221 in)
                          Cam bore diameter25.015-25.040 mm (0.984-0.985 in)
                          ValveValve head diameter — intake34.85-35.15 mm (1.372-1.383 in)
                          Valve head diameter — exhaust29.85-30.15 mm (1.175-1.187 in)
                          Valve stem diameter — intake5.470-5.485 mm (0.2153-0.2159 in)
                          Valve stem diameter — exhaust5.465-5.480 mm (0.2151-0.2157 in)
                          Valve stem-to-guide clearance — intake0.0027 mm (0.0001 in)
                          Valve stem-to-guide clearance — exhaust0.0029 mm (0.00011 in)
                          Valve face runout0.05 mm (0.001 in)
                          Valve face angle45 degrees
                          Valve Spring — Compression PressureIntake and exhaust (installed)17.5 kg (38.667 lbs)Intake (valve open) 8.9 mm (0.35 in) of lift44 kg (97.032 lbs)Exhaust (valve open) 7.4 mm (0.29 in) of lift42 kg (93.338 lbs)
                          Free length44.92 mm (1.768 in)
                          Assembled height37.9 mm (1.492 in)
                          CrankshaftMain bearing journal diameter51.980-52.000 mm (2.046-2.047 in)Production repair51.730-51.750 mm (2.036-2.037 in
                          )Main bearing clearance0.019-0.035 mm (0.0007-0.0013 in)
                          Connecting rod journal diameter49.980-50.000 mm (1.967-1.968 in)Production repair49.730-49.750 mm (1.957-1.958 in)End play0.22-0.43 mm (0.008-0.016 in)
                          RingsWidth — top1.17-1.185 mm (0.0460-0.0466 in)Width — 2nd1.197-1.199 mm (0.0471-0.0472 in)Width — oil2.38-2.45 mm (0.093-0.096 in)Ring gap (in bore) — top0.16-0.31 mm (0.006-0.012 in)Ring gap (in bore) — 2nd0.33-0.48 mm (0.012-0.018 in)Ring gap (in bore) — oil0.2-0.7 mm
                          (0.007-0.027 in)
                          Valve TappetDiameter30.97-30.98 mm (1.2192-1.2196 in)
                          Tappet-to-valve clearance — intake0.22- 0.28 mm (0.008-0.011 in)
                          Tappet-to-valve clearance — exhaust0.27-0.33 mm (0.010-0.013 in)
                          Tappet-to-bore clearance0.02-0.06 mm (0.0007-0.0023 in)
                          CamshaftLobe lift — intake8.24999 mm (0.324 in)
                          Lobe lift — exhaust7.80007 mm (0.307 in)
                          Runout (1)a 0.03 mm (0.001 in)
                          Thrust clearance0.09-0.24 mm (0.003-0.009 in)
                          Journal diameter24.96-24.98 mm (0.982-0.983 in)
                          Journal-to-bore clearance0.035-0.080 mm (0.001-0.003 in)
                          Connecting RodBearing clearance0.027-0.052 mm
                          (0.001-0.002 in)
                          Bearing thickness1.496-1.520 mm (0.058-0.059 in)
                          Crank bore diameter53.025-53.045 mm (2.087-2.088 in)
                          Pin bore diameter20.965-20.985 mm (0.825-0.826 in)
                          Length (center to center)154.8 mm (6.094 in)
                          Side clearance1.95-3.05 mm (0.076-0.120 in)
                          Axial clearance0.14-0.36 mm (0.005-0.014 in)
                          a No. 3 Journal — Supported by No. 1 and No. 5 journals.


                          General Specifications ItemSpecification

                          EngineDisplacement2.3
                          LNo. of cylinders4
                          Bore/stroke87.5/94.0
                          Firing order1-3-4-2
                          Oil pressure (hot @ 2,000 rpm)200-268 kPa (29-39 psi)
                          Oil capacity3.9L + 0.38L (4.1 qt + 0.4 qt) with filter
                          Cylinder BlockCylinder bore diameter87.5-87.53 mm (3.444-3.446 in)
                          Cylinder bore maximum out-of-round0.008 mm (0.0003 in)
                          Main bearing bore diameter57.020-57.038 mm (2.244-2.245 in)
                          Head gasket surface flatness0.1 mm/general 0.05 mm/200 x 200 (0.003 in./general) (0.0019 in./7.87 x 7.87)
                          PistonDiameter (1)87.5-87.51 mm (3.444-3.445 in)Diameter (2)87.51-87.52 mm (3.4452-3.4456 in)Diameter (3)87.52-87.53 mm (3.4456-3.4460 in)
                          Piston-to-bore clearance0.025-0.045 mm (0.0009-0.0017 in)
                          Ring groove width — top1.203-1.205 mm (0.0473-0.0474 in)Ring groove width — 2nd1.17-1.19 mm (0.0460-0.0468 in)Ring groove width — oil2.501-2.503 mm (0.0984-0.0985 in)
                          Piston skirt coating thickness0.008-0.020 mm (0.0003-0.0007 in)
                          Piston PinDiameter20.995-21.0 mm (0.8265-0.8267 in)
                          Length59.6-60.4 mm (2.346-2.377 in)
                          Piston-to-pin clearance0.008-0.016 mm (0.0003-0.0006 in)
                          Pin-to-rod clearancePress fi
                          tCylinder HeadValve lift @ zero lash (exhaust)7.4 mm (0.30 in)Valve lift @ zero lash (intake)7.9 mm (0.31 in)
                          Valve guide diameter5.509-5.539 mm (0.216-0.218 in)
                          Valve seat width — intake/exhaust0.99-1.84 mm (0.038-0.072 in)
                          Valve seat angle45 degrees
                          Valve seat runout0.075 mm (0.0029 in)
                          Valve lash adjuster bore diameter31.00-31.03 mm (1.220-1.221 in)
                          Cam bore diameter25.015-25.040 mm (0.984-0.985 in)
                          ValveValve head diameter — intake34.85-35.15 mm (1.372-1.383 in)
                          Valve head diameter — exhaust29.85-30.15 mm (1.175-1.187 in)
                          Valve stem diameter — intake5.470-5.485 mm (0.2153-0.2159 in)
                          Valve stem diameter — exhaust5.465-5.480 mm (0.2151-0.2157 in)
                          Valve stem-to-guide clearance — intake0.0027 mm (0.00010 in)
                          Valve stem-to-guide clearance — exhaust0.0029 mm (0.00011 in)
                          Valve face runout0.05 mm (0.0019 in)
                          Valve face angle45 degrees
                          Valve Spring — Compression PressureIntake and exhaust (installed)17.5 kg (38.667 lb)Intake (valve open) 8.9 mm (0.35 in) of lift44 kg (97.032 lb)Exhaust (valve open) 7.4 mm (0.29 in) of lift42 kg (93.338 lb)
                          Free length44.92 mm (1.768 in)
                          Assembled height37.9 mm (1.492 in)
                          CrankshaftMain bearing journal diameter51.980-52.000 mm (2.046-2.047 in)Production repair51.730-51.750 mm (2.036-2.037 in)
                          Main bearing clearance0.019-0.035 mm (0.0007-0.0013 in)
                          Connecting rod journal diameter49.980-50.000 mm (1.967-1.968 in)Production repair49.730-49.750 mm (1.957-1.958 in)
                          End play0.22-0.43 mm (0.008-0.016 in)
                          RingsWidth — top1.17-1.185 mm (0.0460-0.0466 in)
                          Width — 2nd1.197-1.199 mm (0.0471-0.0472 in)
                          Width — oil2.38-2.45 mm (0.093-0.096 in)Ring gap (in bore) — top0.16-0.31 mm (0.006-0.012 in)Ring gap (in bore) — 2nd0.33-0.48 mm (0.012-0.018 in)Ring gap (in bore) — oil0.2-0.7 mm
                          (0.007-0.027 in)
                          Valve TappetDiameter30.97-30.98 mm (1.2192-1.2196 in)
                          Tappet-to-valve clearance — intake0.22- 0.28 mm (0.008-0.011 in)
                          Tappet-to-valve clearance — exhaust0.27-0.33 mm (0.010-0.013 in)
                          Tappet-to-bore clearance0.02-0.06 mm (0.0007-0.0023 in)
                          CamshaftLobe lift — intake8.24999 mm (0.324 in)
                          Lobe lift — exhaust7.80007 mm (0.307 in)Runout (1)a 0.03 mm (0.001 in)
                          Thrust clearance0.09-0.24 mm (0.003-0.009 in)
                          Journal diameter24.96-24.98 mm (0.982-0.983 in)
                          Journal-to-bore clearance0.035-0.080 mm (0.001-0.003 in)
                          Connecting RodBearing clearance0.027-0.052 mm
                          (0.001-0.002 in)
                          Bearing thickness1.496-1.520 mm (0.058-0.059 in)
                          Crank bore diameter53.025-53.045 mm (2.087-2.088 in)
                          Pin bore diameter20.965-20.985 mm (0.825-0.826 in)
                          Length (center to center)154.8 mm (6.094 in)
                          Side clearance1.95-3.05 mm (0.076-0.120 in)
                          Axial clearance0.14-0.36 mm (0.005-0.014 in)a No. 3 Journal — Supported by No. 1 and No. 5 journals.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Day 2

                            I picked up the missing rail rings (above and under the oil control ring), the valves and a new set of main bearings.

                            Below is a picture of the engine block with the upper halves of the shells installed and lubed with assembly oil:



                            I installed the new bearings, and put a strip of plastigage on the bottom halves of the bearing shells to measure the tolerance. Plastigage is a very thin round strand of plastic material (think spagetti) used to measure the clearance between two surfaces. When compressed it is flattened out over the surface and the width of the flattened strip tells you the clearance.

                            I put a strand on each half-shell in the rail that goes over the crank shown above. (You don't want the crank resting on the plastigage, hence flattening it with its weight.) When this was done, I installed the new Cosworth main studs and torqued the rail in place. The main difference between the Cosworth studs and the stock ones are that these are reusable, which is good since I immediately disassembled the crank again to look at the plastigage:



                            The strip width indicated that I was at the upper limit of tolerances, but since the plastigage leaves some marginals for interpretation, I decided to be happy about it.

                            Reassemble again and voila, crank is done:




                            The piston rings then got installed, and I had time to do a test insert of a piston into the cylinder before my wife came home and declared playtime over.

                            To be continued.

                            /Magnus F.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Day 3/4

                              The Raceline waterrail did not fit either the Ranger head, or the Focus head Cosworth uses for their own head, due to some lift eye treads. I don't really know which head the rail will fit, maybe something European. On the image below the pieces that need to go are marked with a sharpie:




                              Now, since I am quite paranoid about aluminum debris in the engine, which will give it an expected life span of four weeks, I decided to go full on bondage on the head and brought out ye olde duct tape:



                              After this I brought over the engine to the dirty part of the garage (opposite of my assembly area) and got down to business with grinder, dremel and file. The end result, after removing the duct tape and going over the head with compressed air, looked like this:



                              The water rail now fits, albeit tightly.

                              Time for the valve fest, which is presented below in mind numbing detail for two purposes: to get feedback from the forum if I've missed something, and to bore you to death.

                              1) Empty valve hole (to the rigjt).




                              2) The valve (exhaust 30mm), all lubed up and ready to go. According to Cosworth, no valve lapping is needed prior to installation. In Cosworth I trust.




                              3) Valve inserted. The stickyness of the assembly oil holds it in place.





                              4) Stem goes over valve and is seated against the head. It needs to be pushed down all the way using two screw drivers. Don't forget to apply engine oil to the stem seal before treading it over the valve.





                              5) Valve spring and retainer placed loosely on top of the stem. Right side up on the spring. All springs are the same for exhaust and inlet valves.






                              6) Compress spring with the correct valve spring compressor tool. This was a bitch to get right since the stock "reach around" valve compressor didn't reach deep enough into the head to compress the valve. I had to mess around with the tool shown here in order to get it right.






                              7) Closeup of compressed spring with everything ready for valve lock insertion. I applied a dab of assembly oil to the top of the valve in order for the valve locks to stick.
                              The locks are inserted with a pincette or a magnetic screew driver, whatever you have handy or can steal from your wife.

                              Make sure that the locks engage the groove at the top of the valve.




                              8) The finished valve installation looks like this:






                              9) Repeat 15 more times and you end up with a complete valve installation and an aggressive lack of interest for all future valve work:




                              To be continued.

                              /Magnus F.

                              Comment

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